A view on Fishing,Community and Life on the NW coast of Scotland

Posts tagged ‘Applecross Hydro’

Rain at Last

(Tuesday) Given the choice between a 33C urban office job or a grey still morning with soft falling Highland rain on a glass sea,

well there isn’t really any way I could do the 33C one.

Took a couple of hours to get on the water on Monday morning. A longish, felt longer than it was, shift at the Inn. Occasionally the odd shift drags and looking at the clock becomes a regular glance every twenty minutes. Plenty of people through and no one knows you are a bit out of sorts. Headache kicks in properly mid afternoon despite lots of painkillers. They still came from as far afield as Hawaii and Sardinia. Home via the Chalet internet and bed by ten. Although it is still busy it feels a lot quieter at the Inn. Still no tables but at least the residents are not waiting for their’s and there is not a queue of twenty.

(Friday evening) you could say it is a bit of a recovery day. Needed a long sleep and even with that behind me there is a pretty constant tiredness in the old legs. With the week almost done it is not that surprising as most days it has been pretty physical. Today’s recovery day involved a bit of a catch up at the Chalet, hoping not for much longer as Alison is taking our broadband contact home from Inverness to work on our switch over. We and others have been off for four weeks now, too long. Had a conversation about it today and it feels like a rerun of the Filling Station problems. Crashing every day, rebooting, late billing and general stress. The fact that fuel is no longer is not a topic of anyone’s chat is testimony to how well it is being run by the Trading Company now. I am hoping this will be the case with our broadband in the months to come.

So a visit to the Community Hall where the School entertained us by running a French Cafe lunch, with Thor, Mason and Lily attending our table, in French no less. Lots of Potential for front of house at the Inn. The onion soup and chocolate cake were pretty good as well. Sam and Caroline are up from deep Deep South and arranged for Sam to come up to the Hydro screen checking it over for a clean. After Mick’s visit last week was thinking all was not quite as it should be with a fair bit of rain it was only running at 54 kWhs this morning. Looking at local streams I reckoned there should be more power being produced. After a wander through Carnoch, with Sam, visiting his favourite birch tree,

we made it to the top via the Archeological Trail.. By the time we came back down to the Turbine House there were 84kWhs being produced.  via the Archeological Trail. Lots of chat about land, sea and everything else, and a lesson learned about cleaning the screen

more regularly in the summer.

Better to have wet feet rather than wet shoes. You can see half the screen clean and the water going through while most is running over the dirty half.

Does not matter what the weather the view is always worth a stop and look.

Came back down through the coppicing part of Carnoch after Sam stopping to admire the Hebridean Barns, resuscitated through the ALPs project and reverting to its original purpose of clothes dryer.

We were in good company as well.

Fishing has stayed at a very healthy level with only 250/300 creels hauled to get the requisite amount for the Inns and a decent wage. Although tired my extra wee trip out on the evening of the Solstice was not regretted. On the way when I was heading back to the lights of Applecross, the hum of the Diesel engine and the breaking of the water against the bow, I went back in time and thought of the fishermen of Applecross who spent a week at a time away from home and what they must have been thinking of when they saw the lights of home after their week away, in far harsher conditions than I usually experience. Apart from the many octopodes,

occasional gannet

and that sunset

it was the simple routine of hauling, emptying, rebaiting, stacking and reshooting the creels.

Often said and thought by me that these trips to sea keep my sanity intact after the frenzy of the Inn. This week has been a little easier, a little dip in the numbers to just being busy. That’s every table being full but not the twenty people waiting. There are a fair amount of workmen at Sand and the biggest problem they have is accommodation. Amusing as that was one of the selling points during discussions around the Range expansion, that the work would fill accommodation places in Applecross. My quiet protestations that this was not necessary fell on deaf ears but has proven to be true. The first visit of Tarneybackle took place last night and they went down a storm, especially as they did not sing Sam the Skull. There was dancing till late and a return visit in three weeks is on the cards so farewells were not too extreme.

And always a view to stop and see on the way to and from the Inn.

In the News

Sometimes there is just a wee bit too much going on. Feels like we are not really living at home just now as our internet is not functioning and sounds like another week is on the cards. We are switching over from ADSL to fibre optic and involves IP addresses and there has not been smooth changeover in any of the community Broadlands up and down the west coast. This is the fundamental problem with the rural economy, there are not enough people living on the lands that the community does not own. We just do not have the numbers to take on all the services that other places take for granted and used to be carried out by the Local Councils. The view from the temporary office is not too bad though.

The consultation that is going on just now is extremely frustrating in that it is a visionary/wish list but if things went ahead my question is who is going to run all the ideas. Keep saying it but we need 100 more people who want this life style to live here. It is hard work doing one, two or even three jobs, raise a family and then volunteer to keep essential services going. It is the nature of the modern world that consultations have to take place at all but for funding applications one does need to show community support of some kind, but there is always a danger of misuse of these for ulterior purposes. Can only hope that this one is not one of these. I have hung in but find doing practical stuff, Filling Station, Hydro etc is more rewarding than a talk shop and have dropped out. I can go to the Inn for that.

So on Monday last it was a 3.50am start as I was told the Beeb were coming in to do a wee news item on creel fishing and the obvious benefits as opposed to the prawn trawl but more of that later. Fished well and spent a couple of hours trying to retrieve one of my lost fleets with no success. Was alongside the pier by 1.00pm but camera did not turn up on time and it was 3.30pm before I was cycling up the road with the catch to the Inn. What I did not know and often happens when the routine is broken and just a little bit more tired I headed ashore leaving all the electronics switched on. So Thursday morning saw us back out but nought in the batteries so no fish. Two day trickle charge but weather poor on Saturday so lucky with good fishing the langoustines lasted until Sunday lunch. The Inn was a little strange in that Friday and Saturday evenings were a wee bit quieter than normal but both Thursday and Sunday certainly made up for it. Long long and very busy shifts with lots of people stories and great comments from happy people heading off north. Back on the horse this week and it is a hard week working this weather on your own. It is not settled but not too windy, Took today off mind you as it was a 5/7 southerly forecast and it turned out to be a white horse day. Managed a bit of work considering it was my “hit the wall” day. The night at the Inn was full on again and still here as the boss is away having a curry next door to the schoolhouse.

So in between the work and the Beeb there was a wee gathering of greens at Achnasheen where a lot of interest was shown about sustainable fishing. Very direct questioning and a good receptive audience. Fine lunch and company and as usual the connections are everywhere when I met one of the group. Plan B were in Applecross many years ago and at the end of the summer put on a play/music involving some fine musicians and acting. Anne Woods was on the fiddle and here she was, only just recognised her but good to meet up again after so long. Really sorry to see Topher not making it through to the HC, he would have been a good councillor. I never miss a chance to describe the fishery and compare how it was to how it is now to show that although we can make a good living still we should have a far healthier sea than we have. And then it was the Community Council AGM and a Chair Report to do. It is only when you look back over the year you realise all the things that have gone on, from defribulators to keeping the HC up to date on the hammering the Bealach is getting because of the NC500. There are now a couple of places where it will be dangerous soon. One wonders what a Bealach closure will do to the local economy, but if we do not get some remedial work on the Hill then this is bound to happen.

Fishing this week continues to produce plenty of langoustines, no squats but one cannot have everything. Interesting day yesterday when we hauled the three fleets and then went to see if I could recover the missing one. Had an older fleet shot where I had lost it and picked up the creels in almost the perfect position, the third last creel picked up the last creel of the missing fleet. Only problem was I now had two ends wrapped round the south-east can and after buoying off the missing fleet I managed to get a finger trapped under a bar tight rope. Possibly cracking a bone going by the size of ring finger today. But all is well as after a bit of organising I have more creels to catch langoustines again. All with the loss of one old creel and 50 metres of rope. Ended up a little too close to the can

and it’s resident who was using it as a fishing post was getting a little nervous too.

The news item has been broadcast and generally well received by the public with the inevitable backlash from the trawl sector, but more of that next time.

The weather over the last week and a half has been mixed

but summer is showing its full green coat

with the sea scenes more changeable, greyer

and more in tune for sail boats.

A few less photos about just now as one of my lenses has made its way to Edinburgh for a revamp due mainly to the harsh conditions on board. The contact between body and lens seems to have given up. Thinking of treating myself to a shore camera.

As well as Broadband the Hydro has been acting up a little. Remote access has kept it going but a visit from Mick was required this week and the classic IT solution was carried out to over ride a software glitch and with the more unpredictable weather it is back up to maximum out put after our very dry spell. A bit more investigation is going to be carried out to find initial cause.As a whole it is going really well and after rents, investor interest payments and building up capital reserves there should be monies coming to the Community soon.

Fishing, Goodbyes and a bit of the Inn.

What a strange couple of days. Saturday I had planned an early fishing before going over to Plockton to see Bruce off, but that never happened as the Friday fishing was good enough to see through the weekend. Took at leisurely drive over calling in at Erbusaig for a wee catch up with a couple of mates before heading down to Plockton Hall. As some one said after, the bar was set high on how to see some one off. Although a sad occasion there were stories of his life, his skills, motor bikes (managing to blow two pistons on his mates bike), fishing tales alongside his innate knowledge of the waters around the Inner Sound, helpfulness with the Plockton Sailing Club in particular the safety boat. Always interested in the other side of people, the knowledge and interest he had in science and technology, so much more to Bruce than met the eye. And you meet many people you have n’t seen for a few years and more, “always at weddings and funerals”. Unfortunately there were more funerals than one could go to this week, but I always think if you think that some one is in your thoughts and life keeps you away from attending there are many ways in which you can show respect. These are not necessarily in the public eye but satisfy yourself in saying goodbye in other ways, this was the case regarding John and neighbour, Janet.

So back to the Inn and a surprisingly quieter evening, still people waiting for tables and a couple of late entrants but went calmly through service and home before eleven. Internet difficulties currently as we are switching over from ADSL lines to fibre optic and is being done remotely. Causing a fair few problems as our communication links with the remote operator could be better. Our man on the ground, Sean could not get into the system as the management set up had been changed but relevant info had not been passed on. Result being we have not had a connection for a week. A small problem as you wake up to the insanity in London. It’s with a sense of disbelief that some people can lose their humanity to such an extent of such indiscriminate life taking. And again with Applecross connections two messages on FB saying they were safe from current and previous staff at the Inn.

So you go to the Inn with a heavy feeling and although it sounds trivial one of the first orders goes wrong, but not. To explain, Rabbies bus came in and there were ten, that’s fine, and the drinks order and food order completed, wandered off to other tables. Went back to check everyone had their food and one guy had not. He said he ordered a Chicken Breast, nervously went back to the order and nothing on it so went to kitchen apologised for mistake, same at table, and spent next fifteen minutes off kilter as meal was cooked. Finally got back to table with meal only to find an empty plate in front of him. He had ordered Duck Breast and this had come out while I was faffing about trying to organise his Chicken Breast. Duck was lost in translation and had become Chicken, he was Italian. Customers are oblivious to what goes on behind the scenes. Busy but enjoyable lunch, with locals and visitors loving the good food and also the impromptu music session provided by a batch of guys and girl from around the Invermorriston area. Fine music and they were appreciative of the Inn as we were of their music, covers, Scottish and blues. Left around seven as no longer needed, heading home in the rain, but knowing there is a busy day ahead with an early morning fish coupled with a BBC chap coming to town to talk about inshore fishing.

The fishing goes on and even with the broken weather there is enough time to get out to sea and haul some creels. In between the breaks though…

The weather ashore was not too bad either.

Think I will try to split bees in a week or so if the weather settles down again.

A little changeable though.

Only need to haul 300 or so just now as there are quite a few small and medium langoustines on the grounds despite the attentions of all the Ollies.

A little unusual as this time of year used to be fairly lean as casting shells and breeding takes place. Little interest in food so creels are often empty. The broken bar creels are taking up a little time to mend but will get another year or two out of them. Recycling.

Caught my first skate , the first for a long time.

Reminds me of the girl at the Inn  who was making the flying motion (she had had a couple) and was asking was that a lemon sole. Worked out that possibly it was a skate but the next question was did have it a sting ray. When I suggested that a sting ray had that she disappeared out the door in double time. Unfortunately named passing traffic earlier in the week.

Had a couple of additions on board for Friday and although it was “a fine day ashore” a bit of a breezy day. Again the 300 hauled came up with the goods and the Cobley table were tucking into the results of the day’s endeavours by the time I caught up with them in the evening. Always interesting for reaction to what one does and they seemed impressed with the work rate on board. But it was an easy day as Dave changed over the buckets as they filled up with smaller prawns. Finish up with a picture of the Varuna, still floating.

Hydro Walk and Local Colour.

(Friday evening) Down from a trip up to the Head of the Community Hydro to show Rosslyn and brother Gordon the set up.

We had gone to the Turbine House where Owen joined us but he had band practice so did not head up the track. The view on the way down was worth the trip up on its own. Sights, sounds and chat all contributed to affine evenings walk. Having hauled 360 creels earlier in the day did not lessen the enjoyment although the legs felt it a little. Gordon is well versed in the industry, being involved in geotech in Norway, and may well come up with some new ideas to use the energy locally.

Lots of questions about generation, best times for usage, how much etc. Always good to see things from an outside perspective, learnt that early on in the volunteering scene. On the way up there are always colours

and nature to see and I was always being left behind both on the way up and back down. With the unusual dry spell we are in the 52% down spell included in the business plan.

(Saturday evening) Finishing up at the Inn tonight as have not the energy to go down to the Community Hall to hear the Band of Matthias. Germans playing rock covers. Busy enough evening but little contact, maybe a wee bit too tired but as long as no one knows. Coming up to eighteen hours since work began, earlier start with lambs calling and the rain falling, an unusual occurrence over the last three weeks. Not a fan of dozing so got up and used the forecast for the beginning of the week to get out. Bit of wind on the way so next week not expected to start before Thursday. There was a bit of a change in the blue skies we have had over the last few days.

Was fortunate to only have to haul four fleets as the fishing was fairly good. Despite having a fleet cut and not retired and losing a fleet, suspect some of the buoys the pile barge had wrapped around it was two of mine.

Two fleets down just now having lost one to the north, failing to recover that one after three tries. Not to panic as I will get it back eventually. That is fishing, plan a boat drying out and pressure wash, oil change and a trip to Inverness via Loch Ness Inn when it is windy. No end to the hours of activity. But in amongst it all I enjoy the chats with the elders of the community, random craic about sheep, peat cutting and had a visit from the south end of Raasay. A chap, Willie, who fished on the Mary Ann with my Dad no less. These little dips into the past are good for keeping the older folk alive, the oral history of the area will become harder to maintain in another generation as the world becomes more mobile. Well it is now kicking out time………. and done in the best possible taste.

The colours at sea

and on the shore

are equal to those on land, mostly they are out of sight and mind so tend not to be looked after as well but more of that next.

The light on the way down from the hydro did take the breath away though.

“My Wife danced with Colonel Gaddafi”

Being on the water is the ultimate, just observing the many sights one sees in nature, whether it be a line of cormorants or squid eggs on the creel,

but the balance is working at the Inn which constantly throws up surprise after surprise. You turn up in whatever mood (and yes sometimes it is a shift you just want to get through) and if it is not a particularly good mood these are the ones that are turned round when you meet people. These last three weeks there has been  a stream of fascinating encounters with the various guests of the Inn. Alex,

the young chap from Essex with the Aussie accent, who has decided to walk round the Coast of Britain and Ireland, including all the western isles to raise monies for the RNLI. He so far has raised over £40,000 and is now going down the east coast on his way home. He was struggling a bit with carrying his pack due to back problems but is still under way as far as I know.

Then there are the growing numbers of people who come in the door and call me by name. I have to ask a few questions now to place them and promise to try to remember names…almost impossible as there are so many repeat customers. Trying to use tags does not always work as I have remembered a couple’s dog called Archie, she is a GP in Gorgie and he is press officer for RNLI…but can I remember their names.  Events manager at SEC, architects from Glasgow, accountants from Elgin and a few more dogs called Archie are all coming in. Tonight it was the vets from Springholm and eventually managed to remember the last conversation with them, which I thought was not bad considering they were last here four years ago. Sometimes names do not matter, the four from Minnesota who were in this week were great craic and had a fine night and a drink with them. For them, me borrowing a baseball cap with the logo, “Make Applecross Great Again” coined by Tom and Aron just cracked them up. You find that you have to put Americans at ease, certainly the ones I come across, when we briefly discuss politics. They are at one both embarrassed, unbelieving and to a great extent scared about their new leader and wonder how it has happened. A very general statement but the American citizens who travel tend to have more open, liberal and democratic bent to their views. It is shaping up to be a very interesting summer as already I am being asked for views on Brexit and Independence.

Some you make a connection with that is completely out of the blue. Another group of Americans, this time an L.A. based five, four of whom are TV writers and an actor. They made their way round Applecross, while staying at Eagle Rock and, according to them, were met with what they called incredible kindness where eve they went and even included Dougal, the Applecross I want to know and do. Had a couple of drinks with these people and there is a great exchange of interest in each other’s lives.

They were very interested in the how the Community operates and were hugely interested in the community ventures and struggles and barriers we still have to break down. You could tell that this group were touched by the genuine spirit of Applecross and they are coming back with AK insisting on a day out on the Varuna. As she has done some crabbing on Chesapeake Bay I think she will have no problem in dealing with a day on board.

On thursday evening, it being slightly quieter, noticing that there was a gentleman sitting quietly at table 7 on his own and with his golden retriever, I sat down to have a wee chat. He was staying in room 3 and a rule learned from the Boss Lady is no-one is left out. Many people want to be left in solitude or if there is a couple but you pick up that very quickly and that is part of the deal. However in this case I struck gold. Turns out he was from Harrogate, names exchanged his being John, I found out he is an investor in our Community Hydro Scheme. Incidentally the Turbine House has been beautifully clad

with sustainably cut larch and is looking good. Back to John, a regular visitor and so very supportive of the Community ventures but realistic of the challenges, he was 40 years in the RAF, straight from school and travelled round the world through this occupation. His wife had died eight years ago and he had bought his dog, Poppy, as company. This snippet as well as our wee chat about what a mess we seem to make when we intervene in other people’s countries, in particular the Middle East. Then he casually commented that his wife had danced with Colonel Gaddafi and it was a running joke between them that the Colonel never recovered and went down hill from then on. The late arrival, originally from Ardnamurchan, but spent a bit of time in Sheildaig due to his Mum being nurse there for a time in the eighties, completed an evening that otherwise would be spent watching Netflix, dozing on the couch. The memories from Shiedaig were fun as names were dredged up like “Biter” and being pushed off the pier when he was too cheeky by a fisherman. He couldn’t swim but he was told to stand up and he realised he was in waist deep water. Think I may know the name of the fisherman but better keep that to myself just in case. Then a message comes through from Deep South. A small film crew, claiming not to be in the Bear Grylls category, but interested in wild/adventure activities were put in touch and seem to be coming up this week. Weather not looking so hot but Wednesday seems to be slightly better. Of course being the Applecross Inn the next conversation I have is with a camera woman who is going out to Panama to work with……Bear Grylls. You could not invent the Applecross Inn as you would not believe it.

“Nothing has changed in Applecross since “The Bloody Project””

Typical, just when you want to have a wee chat with a Welsh man you can’t find one anywhere. A lovely shift at the Inn today and while the rain belted down, the fire was on and the food was as good as anywhere in the Highlands, so said the customers, and as you know they are always right. Working my way back and yet another funeral attended, this time on Saturday. Jessie, having passed away earlier, brought memories back from years gone by. Many a visit of a weekend coming from the Inn and stopping off for a late night dram with Angus and Jessie on the way home. Usual chat about fishing from Angus, he first went to sea on the Truelove with my own Dad and I think stayed at sea his whole life. Jessie kept our glasses full and maybe tried to keep us in better shape for the short drive home in the early hours with offers of tea/coffee while Angus gave another rendition of the beautiful Eilidh.. Happy memories. After the internment I went down to the shore to give the dogs a run out and run they did.

9q7q7492

This was after watching the rescue of an Inverness taxi of the now not so immaculate verge at the entrance to the VT.  The afternoon was taken up with rugby and as a Scotland supporter found myself in the unusual position of being relatively relaxed during the final ten minutes of the match, having a cushion of two scores ahead. Kept the volume down for Eilidh and she only became concerned hearing me crossing the room when Scotland scored their last try. On Friday evening I was in two minds whether to go out to yet another meeting, this time a continuance of the Trust led “community” consultation. Decided that it was better to go in order to appreciate things first hand. I have spoken to a number of people who were at the meeting since and there is quite frankly a lot of head scratching going on in the community. No one is saying that consulting about the aspirations of the community is a bad thing but honestly spending 45 minutes discussing the minutiae of the process that has been slumbering on for over a year now had people wondering why they had given up their Friday evening. We still have not even finalised setting up a steering group to set up a Forum, which seems to be a direction we are going come hell or High Water. Interestingly if you have a contrary opinion of direction or of outcomes then you are shown to be against the process. There is a very fine line to be walked by the numerous people in the community who are unhappy with the process. One puts one hand up to be part of a process you can hardly be enthusiastic about as if you don’t you are painted into an anti corner. I believe this whole process depends on one factor and only one. Have the Trustees of the Applecross Trust had a change of mind or direction in running the Applecross Estate that is inclusive or is this just a tick box exercise to counter new Community Powers that will enable us to strengthen our capacity showing that the Trust by its actions and obstruction is working against the sustainable development of the Community. We have heard about “The Shared Vision” ad nauseam but it is only “shared” one way. There has not been one iota from the Trust. I have to agree to a certain extent that the running of the Trust is entirely the duty and work of the Trustees but when it becomes a barrier to the survival of the community I live in that is when I have to quell a certain amount of anger, anger I found reciprocated in conversations the following day. Several questions were asked directly of the Trust and several opinions offered from the floor that showed a level of scepticism regarding any change of direction from the Trustees. I specifically asked for any examples of evidence of a change of heart and received absolutely nothing positive in the response. In fact I was told that a couple of people were worried by my reaction to the answer or lack off offered. I no longer react in such a way any more that would cause any discomfort to the room and still wait for any sign of any change of direction from the Trustees. On Saturday I was given the quote of the decade. “Nothing in Applecross has changed since “The Bloody Project”” A “talk shop” changes nothing here, it will keep open communications, but only if we have at least one Trustee on the Forum and even that has been resisted so far. It is a “shared vision” after all. So next Friday and the next and the next and the next we are as a community supposed to turn up to the Hall to form a Forum which may or may not be constituted, have no powers or objectives other than to discuss. One really annoying part to all this process is that any disagreement is used against the Community to show up its divisions. A tactic that is used all the way up to National Politics level these days. I can easily disagree with many members of our community but am actually finding that I am coming across far more agreement than division. It was quite revealing that a member of the community suggested that the Trustees should take part in a “quiz” about Applecross and see the extent of their knowledge of the community that is so affected by their decisions on running the Trust. I will leave you a quote from this year’s accounts, late by the way but not important for some, stating that the Trustees are maintaining the traditional enterprises,buildings and infrastructure of the Estate “as a place of inspiration for the general public and THOSE WHO LIVE AND WORK THERE”.

Extraordinarily who should be staying in Applecross this weekend but Graeme Macrae Burnet, the author of The Bloody Project. For the few of you who do not know this is a novel about a murder in Applecross in the 19th century and accurately putting forward a sense of what residents had to put up with from The Big House. It made the Man Booker Prize shortlist and Graeme was in town with German publisher and journalists to promote the publication of the Bloody Project in German. They had a great time and left extolling the warmth of the welcome from the Inn, the food and the Applecross experience. It is not all sweetness and light here, as last week, watching from the Inn some visitors being admonished by a resident on their driving. Always gets me going as I think the least we can do is welcome those wishing to visit….it is traditional hospitality. We had a bit of banter when they came in and it turns out they were from Tyrone and were not in the least phased by the rudeness, their words, of an individual after spending 40 years living in a war zone. They left after a proper welcome.

A little break in the weather meant the langoustines and squats are on the menu with more prospects this week. Another funeral planned next week with a busy day thrown in but with weather settling down mid-week we should keep the visitors well fed. There is still always time to appreciate the beauty of the place both on the sea,

9q7q7480

shore,

9q7q7411

9q7q7409

the rivers

9q7q7507

and streams,

9q7q7515

the company,

9q7q7490

9q7q7383

wild life

9q7q7500

9q7q6631

and scenery

9q7q6601

watching other people work to keep the community going,

9q7q7387

9q7q7390

9q7q7393

9q7q7373

9q7q7372

and this makes things so much better.

9q7q7378

I am fighting for the place where I live, many may not agree with a lot of what I say but generally I have not found any other alternative for this community. Leave you with these stats I stated on Friday night. 8 primary school children, 10 people in their 20s and 40% of the population over 60 years of age. If the Trustees are going to engage with the community they are going to have help solve our housing crisis instead of putting up more and different reasons why we cannot have more affordable housing in Applecross and far more people living here.

Music and New Year at Glasgow

(Sat afternoon) Back in Glasgow for this years finale at Celtic Connections and it went very smoothly. Who needs mobile phones, you just arrange to meet up and take it from there. Took ten minutes longer to find the air bandb but with little hassle. Straight back out and off to the Oran Mor for a rip-roaring night of trad music provided by Dosca and Elephant Sessions. I had never heard of Dosca before but will certainly keep an eye out for them in the future. Fiddle, flute, pipes and rhythms with a miners song thrown in and before you knew it their set was over. So good, and then into The headline boys, but before that, at half time I was crowd spotting and by the end of the break had found seven people connected to Applecross. The music was brilliant, driving traditional using traditional instruments getting people to find it impossible to stay still. I noticed a debate about the direction the music is going and have to say I enjoy it, at the same time I have seen the Wainwright Sisters and Songs of Separation along with Mairi Campbell in the last couple of years. There is a greater amount of testosterone about the scene at the moment but music like everything else has its own cycles. Off to do a spot of Trainspotting now before checking out the maestro that Duncan Chisholm is.

Won’t any spoilers on T2 just to say go and see it. It is brilliant. Lots of pathos, humour and reflections on the absurdity that is life. Evening saw us at City Halls and enjoyed some fine fine music played by Duncan Chisholm

9q7q7325

and many of his compadres.

9q7q7327

I love the tunes he plays from his Affric trilogy, especially Crask.Time just flies by and due to ticket not being used, Son No4 came out for the jolly.

Sunday lunch was Italian and another family occasion, but not before checking into a very colourful Chinese New Year gathering

9q7q7337

on George Square.

9q7q7334

9q7q7346

Vibrant reds, yellows

9q7q7356

with smiles to match.

9q7q7345

And as the sign says people make Glasgow.

9q7q7360

One would like to think that is a nation wide concept, barring the few bampots we have scattered round our communities. The food, service and banter was second to none and a rapid two hours passed only with a mild panic at the end with me losing the tickets for the evening concert. Easily sorted by a reprint at the RCH and then proceeded to a grand night of music.

 

Have to admit Graham Mackenzie passed me by but going by the standard of musicians on stage he has been noticed and appreciated by those who know. Then followed the Mark O’Connor Band. Our only experience of Americana music this time round, great blue grass mix of songs, fiddle and mandolin tunes, backed by driving double bass and flat picking guitar. Certainly satiated but had a bit of a nagging feeling of wanting to stay down for more. Knew there were several more bands to see but needs must and we were on the train north on Monday. Does not take long to get back into the flow of things so priority has been to get the paperwork done and several VAT returns have gone in, bills gone out and tax returns worked on. Some deadlines met, certainly the more important ones, some not but getting to having a clear desk for the first time in about ten years. The weather has been fairly inclement but still pretty good for the middle of winter. There have been some lovely glimpses.

9q7q7306

9q7q7305

As well as the book work the routines of wood splitting,

9q7q7284

dipping the Filling Station tanks attending part of a broadband meeting, picking up a couple of boys from the train to work on the broadband network and walking up to the Head to clean the screen and grease the turbine shaft. Did this with company but more of that later. A wee foot note to Celtic Connections, sometimes you don’t get it right. Not going to criticise the music but just that Dub Opera is not my scene. Despite that, there was some great classical Indian singing

img_0129

and a fine pibroch by Barney the piper.

img_0130

 

Tag Cloud

Wee Ginger Dug

Biting the hand of Project Fear

Beyond the Horizon

Commentary and Sustainability Policy Analysis from Dr Calum Macleod

Lenathehyena's Blog

IT'S NOT ROCKET SALAD.........in the Land o' cakes and brither Scots

Scottish Communities CAN

Scottish Communities Climate Action Network

Beyond the Bloomin' Heather

A critical discussion of the history and politics behind Scotland's most beautiful landscapes

Jean Urquhart

following dissolution of parliament this site will move to jeanurquhart.com

justsust

Re-imagining a just and green society

Derek Bateman Broadcaster1

An ongoing dialogue

derek bateman broadcaster2

My first and last ever blog (probably)

Small Scales

fisheries and ocean conservation in Atlantic Canada

UHeye

e-learning, networking, and the UHI

Writing

It's got a backbeat. You can't lose it. If you wanna dance with me.

derek bateman broadcaster2

My first and last ever blog (probably)

Jessica's Nature Blog

https://natureinfocus.blog

Shawndra Miller

Giving voice to the world’s remaking

Hiking Photography

Beautiful photos of hiking and other outdoor adventures.

isleofronalog

Just another WordPress.com site

Life at the end of the road

the trials and tribulations of an accidental crofter

milesmack

A Highland GP on life the universe and anything...