A view on Fishing,Community and Life on the NW coast of Scotland

The routine is slowly kicking in although the fishing has not happened yet. Wednesday, although a decent day, with a nice ending,

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was spent mostly on paper work and was finished off with a shift up the road. Quiet, but not dead. Getting instructions about closing up as that may be more of the theme this year with the Boss taking a little more time out,

Down at the pier most of the day. Took the boat alongside and put ashore the fleet of creels still on board and put some of the new ones on board, fuelled up and hopefully stemmed a bit of a leak on the hydraulic system.

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On the way out the companions were off to the east always watching, drifted a little too close for their comfort,

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but they stayed around long enough for a couple of snaps.

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Put some of the new fleet together and it was back to the mooring. In between all this I took the plunge, not literally, and opened the lid of a disused bait bin that had some herring and some water had got in. If anyone knows what is worse than putrid herring/mackerel I would like to know. Quite literally retching for the first five minutes, but the thin red line kicks and an hour later all done.

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It is a never again job, going through quite a few of them just now. Year going well despite the lack of fishing. All proceeding as planned until the glasses get knocked over the side of the pier, luckily close to the top end and the tide going out, unluckily in amongst all the herring gunk. Had the dogs down with me but had to lock them up. They are really weird in that they go for the grottiest muck around, in this case, the putrid herring. Dogs back home and then down the shore after four to rake around amongst the seaweed and the herring. Dead easy when they went over the side as the bubble wrack was floating, different matter guddling about on the ebb tide. £200 is a nice wee driving force and duly recovered them was back up the road to do a shift at the Inn.

Yesterday I made it out at last, making the most of all yesterday’s prep work. Although I did not notice it at the time it was hard work with lots of ups and downs. First fleet I hauled I tagged one of the lost fleets and just buoyed it off and carried on meaning to lift it at the end of the day. The downside hauling another fleet it broke with no buoy on the north end so that is back to two down. Last fleet was a mess and stayed on board to sort out ashore, there must have been lots of pulling and tugging as there is a fair bit of pain today, remnants of the bug as well, I suppose. Still it was enjoyable being out and watching the traffic,

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birds

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and scenery.

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It is the place.

Wiped last night and did not do much other than doze on the couch, heading off to the pub is a distant memory and will become even more so. Left the camera on board so went off down on the bike with the dog family and they loved the run although always get a little anxious when I go out on the dingy.

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Nice to see their concerned loyalty waiting on the shore.

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On the way back was taken aback by a telling off from a crofter about the dogs not being in control and chasing sheep. Was a little put out as I had made sure they were on the road when the sheep decided to take off, that is when I have to watch Dougal as he sees fun. Sheep run, noticed they are more prone to do this when on the bike and Dougal had nothing to do with it. Ok he was there but what can you do if when he does what he was told and gets knocked for it. Made me think about not jumping to conclusions. I was annoyed with myself when I had the last word, unnecessary but irresistible. When told “It is never the dogs” I could not resist with “Aye, and it’s never the sheep.” True but did not feel clever saying it. Minor and a good game of rugby, before seeing the first half of the more nervous one and off to the Inn. Looking back on the conversations this week have realised that they have been so varied, photography, eastern practices brought by the boat name, Varuna, followed up by a wide-ranging chat about meditation and the like, follow-up from the post about the Saighdear with another story in the chest, land reform thoughts. All this without leaving town, fascinating place to live.

Comments on: "A Couple of Days on the West." (9)

  1. Putrid salmon is quite bad, especially if you have to do a head count in a tub of putrid pink soup. I used to get all the best jobs.

  2. And people wonder why i don’t eat salmon.

    • applecrosslifeattheedge said:

      Had a couple of interesting food chats over the week end and some times you do not want to know. It is a cop out but if you have any inside knowledge is usually not good. It is the processing that screws up the growers and producers. Not fair.

  3. Do not the distant “friends” in Iceland regard putrid fish as a food delicacy? But they also like roast baby puffin so what can one expect…

  4. Salmon farming is no doubt better than it was back in the 90’s when it was still pioneering.

    Actually my dislike of fish is two fold, firstly my mother didn’t like fish so we never had it on a regular basis and secondly the smell I used to have to go past a fish mongers on the way to school.

    Funny how when I went to uni I did a degree in biology and specialised in freshwater fisheries, spending most of my time in labs dissecting fish.

    I do wish now that whilst in Kishorn I had expanded my seafood palate, (i did enjoy prawns when I could get them). I seem to have a craving for squat lobster at the moment which I remember finding in abundance on the mussel ropes but always through back, and something you certainly don’t find in Manchester.

    • applecrosslifeattheedge said:

      Yep not so sure about salmon, but plenty of alternatives, mussels from the dingy, squats in garlic,sweet and sour or a curry, some ling for the fish pie or even the odd prawn.

  5. Now you are making me hungry

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